Archive for the ‘SRI VENKATESWARA SWAMY REAL PHOTO’ Tag

Test of the Three Divinities   Leave a comment

Test of the Three Divinities
At the commencement of the Kali Yuga, Vishnu left Venkatadri for Vaikuntam. Brahma was very unhappy with his departure and asked Narada to persuade Vishnu to return to Venkatadri. Narada then went to the banks of the River Ganga, where several rishis were performing a sacrifice. The rishis could not decide as to whom they intended to dedicate the fruit of their sacrifice. Bhrigu, one of the rishis undertook to solve the problem by examining the three chief divinities. Bhrigu at SatyalokamHe first went to Satyalokam, the abode of the three-headed Brahma (who is also attributed to have four heads) and found him busily chanting the Vedas with one face, uttering the name of Narayana with another and looking at Goddess Saraswati with the third. He took no notice of Bhrigu. Bhrigu resented the want of courtesy on the part of Brahma.
Bhrigu at KailasamBhrigu then went to Siva’s abode (Kailasam). Here too, he found Siva absorbed in sporting with his consort. Siva even became indignant at Bhrigu’s intrusion.

Bhrigu at VishnulokamFinally, Bhrigu went to Vaikuntam, the abode of Vishnu and found Vishnu and Sri Maha Lakshmi reclining on Adisesha. Disgusted, Bhrigu kicked Vishnu on the chest, where Sri Maha Lakshmi was reclining. Vishnu immediately got up, massaged the rishi‘s foot and enquired if he had been injured. Pleased with Vishnu’s attention, Bhrigu returned to the rishis and advised them to dedicate the fruit of their sacrifice to Vishnu.

Sri Maha Lakshmi was angry with Bhrigu because he had kicked the spot which was her favourite resort on the bosom of the Lord. She left Vishnu and went to stay at Karavirapura (now Kolhapur in the state of Maharashtra). Unable to bear the solitude, Vishnu left Vaikuntam in search of Sri Maha Lakshmi.

This was how he made his way to Venkatadri, and entered the ant-hill under the tamarind tree on the southern bank of Swami Pushkarini on the Tirupati hill.

Temple History   Leave a comment

There is ample literary and epigraphic testimony to the antiquity of the temple of Lord Sri Venkateswara.

Sri KrishnadevarayaAll the great dynasties of rulers of the southern peninsula have paid homage to Lord Sri Venkateswara in this ancient shrine. The Pallavas of Kancheepuram (9th century AD), the Cholas of Thanjavur (a century later), the Pandyas of Madurai, and the kings and chieftains of Vijayanagar (14th – 15th century AD) were devotees of the Lord and they competed with one another in endowing the temple with rich offerings and contributions.

It was during the rule of the Vijayanagar dynasty that the contributions to the temple increased. Sri Krishnadevaraya had statues of himself and his consorts installed at the portals of the temple, and these statues can be seen to this day. There is also a statue of Venkatapati Raya in the main temple.

After the decline of the Vijayanagar dynasty, nobles and chieftains from all parts of the country continued to pay their homage and offer gifts to the temple. The Maratha general, Raghoji Bhonsle, visited the temple and set up a permanent endowment for the conduct of worship in the temple. He also presented valuable jewels to the Lord, including a large emerald which is still preserved in a box named after the General. Among the later rulers who have endowed large amounts are the rulers of Mysore and Gadwal.

After the fall of the Hindu kingdoms, the Muslim rulers of Karnataka and then the Britishers took over, and many of the temples came under their supervisory and protective control.

In 1843 AD, the East India Company divested itself of the direct management of non-Christian places of worship and native religious institutions. The administration of the shrine of Sri Venkateswara and a number of estates were then entrusted to Sri Seva Dossji of the Hatiramji Mutt at Tirumala, and the temple remained under the administration of the Mahants for nearly a century, till 1933 AD.

In 1933, the Madras Legislature passed a special act, which empowered the Tirumala Tirupati Devasthanams(TTD) Committee to control and administer a fixed group of temples in the Tirumala-Tirupati area, through a Commissioner appointed by the Government of Madras.

In 1951, the Act of 1933 was replaced by an enactment whereby the administration of TTD was entrusted to a Board of Trustees, and an Executive Officer was appointed by the Government .

The provisions of the Act of 1951 were retained by Charitable and Religious Endowments Act, 1966.

Contest between Adisesha and Vayudeva   Leave a comment

Contest between Adisesha and Vayudeva
During the Dwaparayuga, Vayudeva (the Wind God) went to Vaikuntam to pay his obeisance to Lord Sri Vishnu. The Lord was reclining in the company of Sri Lakshmi. The doorway was guarded by Adisesha. Vayudeva was incensed when Adisesha prevented him from entering Sri Vishnu’s mansion. Adisesha and Vayudeva began to fight with each other.When Lord Vishnu intervened, each was boasting of his superior valour and supreme might. To test who was stronger, the Lord suggested that Adisesha encircle the Ananda hill, an off-shoot of the Meru mountain on its northern side, and that Vayudeva blow hard to try and dislodge the Ananda hill from Adisesha’s hold. The contest waxed furiously, and as the World trembled, Brahma, Indra and the other Divine Beings requested Adisesha to yield victory to Vayudeva for the welfare of the world.

Obliging them, Adisesha released his hold on the hill. As a result, Adisesha and the Ananda hill were blown away to the banks of the river Swarnamukhi. Adisesha was dejected by his defeat. Lord Brahma and the others appealed to him by saying that he would be merged with the hill Venkatadri and Vishnu would reside on him. Adisesha then metamorphosed into the vast Seshadri, with his hood manifesting itself as Venkatadri sustaining Sri Venkateswara, his middle as Ahobila supporting Lord Narasimha, and his tail as Srisailam bearing Lord Mallikarjuna (Lord Siva).

Restoration of the Earth by Adi Varaha   Leave a comment

Restoration of the Earth by Adi Varaha
During the eight thousand yugas (the equivalent of a day and night for Brahma, the Creator), there was a raging fire, and everything on Earth was reduced to ashes. Man had to forsake the Earth and seek refuge in Janaloka.At the approach of night (of Brahma), Vayu, the Wind God, blew furiously. Huge clouds were formed, there was torrential rain, and it resulted in Pralaya Kalpa (the Great Deluge). The Earth sank into the Patala loka, and remained in that state for a thousand years (during a part of that night of Brahma).Sri Adi Varaha bringing up the Earth on His tusks

Sri Maha Vishnu, wanted to rescue the Earth. He assumed the form of Adi Varaha and proceeded to Pataloka. He fought a fierce duel with Hiranyaksa and killed him. He then slashed the water and brought up the Earth on his tusks.

Brahma, the Devas and the sages extolled Adi Varaha’s virtues, by chanting the Vedic mantras. They prayed to Him to re-establish the Earth as before. Adi Varaha obliged them, and called upon Brahma to recreate the world. He expressed his desire to reside on the Earth to protect its people. He commanded his vehicle, Garuda to fetch Kridachala (a massive natural hill with lofty peaks, embedded with gold and precious stones, and which resembled Adisesha in shape) from Vaikuntam.

Garuda brought Kridachala and deposited it on a sacred spot (to the East of Swami Pushkarini) chosen by Adi Varaha. Adi Varaha stood within the divine vimana of Kridachala, which shone with many gem-studded gopuras.

Brahma and the other holy personages requested the fearsome-looking Adi Varaha to assume a tranquil and composed look, and rest on the hill to protect men and grant boons to people unable to reach God through Dhyana Yoga (meditation) and Karma Yoga (doing one’s own duty).

Adi Varaha appeared with four arms and a white face. He was adorned with jewels and accompanied by Bhu Devi. He resolved to stay at Venkatadri, under a divya vimana, to grant the prayers of men.

Temple Legends   Leave a comment

Sri Venkatachala Mahatmya is referred to in several Puranas, of which the most important are the Varaha Purana and the Bhavishyottara Purana.

The printed work contains extracts from the Varaha Purana, Padma Purana, Garuda Purana, Brahmanda Purana, Markandeya Purana, Harivamsa, Vamana Purana, Brahma Purana, Brahmottara Purana, Aditya Purana, Skanda Purana and Bhavishyottara Purana. Most of these extracts describe the sanctity and antiquity of the hills around Tirumala and the numerous teerthams situated on them.

The legends taken from the Venkatachala Mahatmya and the Varaha Purana, pertaining to the manifestation of the Lord at Tirumala, are of particular interest.

According to the Varaha Purana, Adi Varaha manifested Himself on the western bank of the Swami Pushkarini, while Vishnu in the form of Venkateswara came to reside on the southern bank of the Swami Pushkarini.

One day, Rangadasa, a staunch devotee of Vishnu, in the course of his pilgrimage, joined Vaikhanasa Gopinatha, who was going up the Tirumala Hill for the daily worship of Lord Venkateswara. After bathing in the Swami Pushkarini, he beheld the lotus-eyed and blue-bodied Vishnu beneath a tamarind tree. Vishnu was exposed to the sun, wind and rain and was only protected by the extended wings of Garuda.

Rangadasa was astounded by the wonderful sight. He raised a rough wall of stones around the deity, and started supplying flowers faithfully to Gopinatha everyday for Vishnu’s worship.

One day, Rangadasa was distracted by a Gandharva king and his ladies. Consequently, he forgot to supply flowers to Gopinatha for Vishnu’s worship. The Lord then revealed Himself and told Rangadasa that He had been testing the latter’s continence, but Rangadasa had not been steadfast and had succumbed to temptation.

However, the Lord accepted and appreciated Rangadasa’s devoted service to Him till then, and blessed Rangadasa that he would be reborn as an affluent ruler of a province and would enjoy the earthly pleasures. He would continue to serve the Lord, construct a beautiful temple with a vimana and high surrounding walls, and thereby earn eternal glory.

Rangadasa was reborn as Tondaman, the son of the royal couple, Suvira and Nandini. Tondaman enjoyed a pleasurable life as a young man. One day, he set out on a hunting expedition on the Tirumala Hill, and with the help of a forester, saw Vishnu under the tamarind tree. Tondaman returned home, deeply affected by the vision of Vishnu.

Tondaman later inherited his father’s kingdom, Tondamandalam. In accordance with the directions given by Adi Varaha to a forester, Tondaman constructed a prakaram and dvara gopura, and arranged for regular worship of the Lord (according to Vaikhanasa Agama).

In the Kali Yuga, Akasaraja came to rule over Tondamandalam. His daughter Padmavathi was married to Venkateswara. The marriage, officiated by Brahma, was celebrated with great pomp and splendour.

About Sri Venkateswara Temple   Leave a comment

The ancient and sacred temple of Sri Venkateswara is located on the seventh peak, Venkatachala (Venkata Hill) of the Tirupati Hill, and lies on the southern banks of Sri Swami Pushkarini.

It is by the Lord’s presidency over Venkatachala, that He has received the appellation, Venkateswara (Lord of the Venkata Hill). He is also called the Lord of the Seven Hills.

The temple of Sri Venkateswara has acquired unique sanctity in Indian religious lore. The Sastras, Puranas, Sthala Mahatyams and Alwar hymns unequivocally declare that, in the Kali Yuga, one can attain mukti, only by worshipping Venkata Nayaka or Sri Venkateswara.

The benefits acquired by a piligrimage to Venkatachala are mentioned in the Rig Veda and Asthadasa Puranas. In these epics, Sri Venkateswara is described as the great bestower of boons. There are several legendsassociated with the manifestation of the Lord at Tirumala.

The temple has its origins in Vaishnavism, an ancient sect which advocates the principles of equality and love, and prohibits animal sacrifice.

The sanctum sanctorum which houses the awe-inspiring idol of the Lord of the Seven Hills is situated in the main temple complex of Tirumala.

TIRUMALA VISITING PLACES   Leave a comment

The Tirumala Hills is 3,200 feet above sea level, and is about 10.33 sq miles in area. It comprises seven peaks, representing the seven hoods of Adisesha, thus earning the name, Seshachalam. The seven peaks are called Seshadri, Five persons are allowed for Shrivari Darshan. Laddus will be given after darshan. Laddu Padi tickets are sold at Vijaya Bank. Neeladri, Garudadri, Anjanadri, Vrishabhadri, Narayanadri and Venkatadri.

These seven hills are:

  • Seshadri
  • Neeladri
  • Garudadri
  • Anjanadri
  • Vrishabhadri
  • Narayanadri
  • Venkatadri
Climb or drive high up to Tirumala, nestling among the seven hills in the Eastern Ghats, Catch the exquisitely carved gold gopuram of the Lord Venkateshwara Temple, glinting in the sun. The Tirumala shrine is a masterpiece of Dravidian architecture. This ancient temple has also found a mention in various Sastras and Puranas. That’s not all. There are other famous shrines in Tirupati town – Govindarajaswamy. Kodanda ramaswamy, Tiruchanur (Goddess Padmavathi), Kapila Theertham (Lord Shiva) and Srinivasa Mangapuram (Sri Venkateshwara).

Tirumala Map

Venkatadri The sacred temple of Sri Venkateswara is located on the seventh peak, Venkatdri. Temple of Lord Venkateshwara, popularly known as Balaji, at Tirumala, is regarded as the world’s richest temple. Pilgrims have both the options of going by foot as well as by road from Tirupati to Tirumala. Administration has provided various facilities like free transportation of luggage, supply of portable water, lavatories, small shops for refreshment and snacks, etc.

For those who wants to travel by road to Tirumala, there are two well-laid roads, one for onward journey while the other is for downward journey. The government runs a regular bus service between Tirupati and Tirumala from the four bus stations: Sri Venkateswara Bus Station, Balaji Link Bus Station, Sapthagiri Link Bus Station, and Sri Padmavathi Bus Station.

Some must-see places at Tirumala:

  • Pushkarini
  • Varahaswamy Temple
  • Sri Hathiramjee Mutt
  • Bedi Anjaneya Temple
  • Srivari Sikhara Darshanam
  • Sila Thoranam
  • Dharmagiri
  • Narayangiri
  • Papavinasanam Trip
  • Papavinasanam
  • Akasaganga
  • Temple Museum

Landmarks on Tirumala & Tirupathi:

  • Gogarbham Gardens
  • To See around Tirupati
  • Kapila Teertham
  • Chandragiri
  • Sri Govindarajaswamy Temple
  • Sri Kodanda Ramaswamy Temple
  • Regional Science Centre
  • Municipal Park
  • Tirupati Sightseeing
  • Sri Padmavathi Temple at Tiruchanoor
  • Sri Kalashasti

Temples in and around Tirumala:

  • Sri Venkateswara Temple
  • Sri Varahaswami Temple
  • Sri Bedi Anjaneyaswami Temple
  • Sri Anjaneyaswami Temple
  • Teerthams

Other Places:

  • Places in and around Tirupati Sri Padmavathi Ammavari Temple,Tiruchanoor
  • Sri Govindarajaswami Temple, Tirupati
  • Sri Kodandaramaswami Temple, Tirupati
  • Sri Kapileswaraswami Temple, Tirupati
  • Sri Kalyana Venkateswaraswami Temple, Srinivasa Mangapuram
  • Sri Kalyana Venkateswaraswami Temple, Naryanavanam
  • Sri Vedanarayanaswami Temple, Nagalapuram
  • Sri Venugopalaswami Temple, Karvetinagaram
  • Sri Prasanna Venkateswaraswami Temple, Appalayanagunta
  • Sri Chennakesavaswami Temple, Tallapaka
  • Sri Kariyamanikyaswami Temple, Nagiri
  • Sri Annapurna Sameta Kasi Visweswaraswami Temple, Bugga Agraharam
  • Other Temples Sri Venkateswara Temple, Rishikesh
  • Sri Chandramouleswaraswami Temple, Rishikesh
  • Sri Pattabhiramaswami Temple, Vayalpad
  • Sri Venkateswara Temple
  • Sri Varahaswami Temple
  • Sri Bedi Anjaneyaswami Temple
  • Sri Anjaneyaswami Temple
  • Swami Pushkarini

Holy water sites:

  • Akasaganga Teertham
  • Papavinasanam Teertham
  • Pandava Teertham
  • Kumaradhara Teertham
  • Tumbhuru Teertham
  • Ramakrishna Teertham
  • Chakra Teertham
  • Vaikuntha Teertham
  • Sesha Teertham
  • Sitamma Teertham
  • Pasupu Teertham
  • Japali Teertham
  • Sanaka Sanandana Teertham

Tourist attractions:

  • Silathoranam
  • TTD Gardens
  • Asthana Mandapam
  • Sri Venkateswara Dhyana Vignan Mandiram
  • Deer Park
  • Sri Vari Museum
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